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Author Topic: Writer Discussion Table  (Read 82455 times)

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Offline RaziKitsune

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Re: Writer Discussion Table
« Reply #1800 on: September 10, 2017, 10:38:37 PM »
I am kinda jumping into the conversation here, but, I also used to write a certain amount a day for my fanfiction projects when I did write. My personal goal was always 5,000 minimal. To me that was a nice lengthy chapter but to some it could be considered too long. So basically, I wrote a chapter a day and in the end, my best work ended up surpassing 50k.

My worst enemy is writers block. Even though that's most writers problem so no surprise there. Plus, I always seem to have trouble completing a writing project. Even if I roughly plot out everything I am still struggling with filling in all the details in depth.

Offline Fronomenal

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Re: Writer Discussion Table
« Reply #1801 on: December 09, 2017, 06:47:26 PM »
I've taken an interest in the r/writing subreddit on reddit recently and I have to say they have some really some good writing prompts on there. I've been wanting to participate for awhile now, but I never to seem to get around to it.

But this leads me into somewhat of an related question. What is the best social media or forum community platform for writers to share their work and build a following with? The number of avenues for writers to garner exposure and support for their work has increased exponentially over the years and I've been wondering if there's a definitive place for writers to flock to.

Of course the obvious answer is any, but for the sake of discussion what do you guys think?

Offline Coryn

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Re: Writer Discussion Table
« Reply #1802 on: December 10, 2017, 10:37:56 AM »
I guess it's all a matter of personal taste. Fanfiction.net is sort of a perennial thing for such work, but I'm not so sure if it's necessarily the best. Honestly, the best way to garnwr a following for anything is probably Twitter, regardless of where the story is actually posted.

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Offline Robin Ryuu

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Re: Writer Discussion Table
« Reply #1803 on: December 15, 2017, 06:50:07 PM »
I'm still struggling with figuring out which of my stories would be suited for which medium. Novels, comics, visual novels, etc. :/

Anyone have an opinion on this?

Offline devola

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Re: Writer Discussion Table
« Reply #1804 on: December 15, 2017, 07:10:14 PM »
There are a lot of ways to gauge which medium is the best for your project. I think the first thing to think about is what are the strengths/weaknesses of each medium in relation to your stories. I think there are a lot of inherent challenges related to each medium so no one medium is easier than the other.

For example, since a novel is entirely text based, you have to pay extra attention to making sure your writing technique is spot on. This includes things as basic as grammar but also as esoteric as "natural dialogue" and other aspects that can be very hard to do if you've never done it before. As a suggestion, I'd say stories heavy on drama and human/emotional conflict tend to benefit from novels (though this is by no means the standard, there are plenty of drama heavy comics).

As for comics, this is a trickier one. I think the biggest challenge in a comic format is not actually the art itself, I feel like so long as you are confident in your own abilities, it won't impact your readers all that much if they buy into your story. Story is the trickiest part here honestly, in a comic book format you HAVE to take advantage of the fact that it is a /visual/ medium. That means, telling story through art and not just dialogue. A huge mistake I see a lot of amateur comic book artists make is "telling instead of showing" what's going on. The inherent challenge here is, you have WAY less words to work with and you have to get creative with your art to tell the story. A lot of artists fail to take advantage of the visual medium to do this, they forgo using elements like gutter space and the unique way in which time passes in a comic and basically just write a novel with some images, which leads into the next point:

Visual novels are a weird grey area between the two I think. The visual elements of a VN can enhance the reading elements and vice versa, you kind of have elements of both worlds. Personally though, I think VNs are best in that they make difficult areas of both more convenient, though that's just my opinion. What I mean by this is overall you have to do less art, and you can get away with less descriptive writing in a VN.

TL;DR
Novels are great if you're confident in your ability to write well and you have a story that benefits from lots of writing. Comics are great if you take advantage of the fact that it is a visual medium. VN's are a comfy spot between the two and in my opinion is the most convenient because you can take shortcuts (though the best VNs don't, and there are other challenges to VNs as well, such as programming, music, etc etc, the best VNs take advantage of all of these elements). So ask yourself, what advantages in each medium would each of your stories benefit the most from?

Offline Robin Ryuu

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Re: Writer Discussion Table
« Reply #1805 on: December 15, 2017, 07:18:02 PM »
I was more meaning more like the types of story like I know action heavy stories might be better as a comic and dialogue heavy stories/dramas tend to do better as novels.

Offline devola

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Re: Writer Discussion Table
« Reply #1806 on: December 15, 2017, 07:27:12 PM »
I guess I might gone overboard with the wall of text haha. What I meant to say is, ask yourself what can YOU take advantage of best? I found it helpful just to think of the medium as a series of elements that I can either take advantage of, or be challenged by. If there were more elements that helped my own style of story telling (for any particular story) then I would consider that medium but if there were more elements that I could not take advantage of, I would move on.

That's basically how I decided on doing a VN for one of my own stories since I can write my own music, do my own art (though not good enough to carry the entire story which is why I avoided a comic) and I can write decently (but not good enough imo to write a novel). See what I'm getting at?

Offline Fronomenal

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Re: Writer Discussion Table
« Reply #1807 on: March 27, 2018, 08:00:13 AM »
I got a really odd question to ask that may be hard to give a definite answer to.

How do you know when you reach that next level in your writing? Does a light bulb flash in your head while you're writing and you realize that everything you used to struggle with is coming easier to you now? Is it based on personal perspective of how you measure your own work? Or is based on the opinions of others that gives you the assurance needed to confidently say to yourself, "Oh yeah, I'm getting pretty good at this."

My brotha from another mother, Lego (Come back soon homie), told me some time ago that my writing improved, and to be honest, I've only had a faint grasp on what he might've saw back then. His comment is part of the reason why I'm asking this question.

Offline Coryn

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Re: Writer Discussion Table
« Reply #1808 on: March 27, 2018, 02:03:27 PM »
For me, it's always sort of the same. I'll be writing, then I'll stop mid sentence, think: 'this is good. Too good >.>'

I think you need to have your own understanding of what is and what is not 'good writing'. Lord knows I've written stuff that was well received but I felt was pretty subpar. It's all well and good for others to say so, but unless you can recognize it in yourself, then it doesn't much matter if you're better or not.

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Offline MK

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Re: Writer Discussion Table
« Reply #1809 on: March 27, 2018, 03:09:20 PM »
Well I find that writing is a bit harder to track yourself getting better because you need to complete an arc or whole story to see results.  In my opinion, the story as a whole, character development, theme is going to determine how good it is, not just 1 part of the story.  Have a boring start and you lose your reader, boring/bad middle and the reader will put down the book, boring/bad ending and they are disappointed.
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Offline Fronomenal

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Re: Writer Discussion Table
« Reply #1810 on: March 31, 2018, 05:35:42 PM »
Both are good points, especially MK's point regarding looking at the entirety of the stories you worked on to get good idea of one's progress as a writer.

I think for me, and this applies to just about everything in life I dedicate time and work to, after a while of me working on something for so long, I would just get this feeling that I've really improved. It's almost like this  sudden burst of confidence that sort of envelops me and I pick up on it and cultivate it further. Pretty much that light bulb moment I mentioned earlier.

Not always the most tangible way of tracking and recognizing your progress, but it works for me from time to time.

Offline Fronomenal

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Re: Writer Discussion Table
« Reply #1811 on: April 06, 2018, 07:42:40 PM »
I just recently purchased a book of poetry a coworker of mine wrote and published four years ago called "Welcome to the Revolution."

He told me around the time he decided to publish the book, he kept running into publishing scams (or at least it sounded that way) that he poured his money into and saw no form of success from it. He eventually found a publishing company that offered to publish the book for free, only catch was that he had to handle all of the editing and other processes himself.

The book got published and he really believed that it would pop off and see reasonable success. Unfortunately it only sold around four or so copies, with my copy being one of them.

Even though we joke about it work, it honestly sucked to hear something like that from a fellow a writer, so I bought the book as a way to support him. Funny enough, the book is actually pretty good so far. It's poetry, but a lot of them read like early 90's raps, which I can appreciate. Of course, that would mean the material is also dated (Most of the poems were written in the 90's, so duh), and I can see why a book like his wouldn't see much profit in today's climate. But regardless, I still enjoy it for what it is.

All in all, I say all this to say that it felt really good to support a fellow writer- hell, a fellow brother at that. He appreciated the fact that I actually read the poems unlike the other people he sold the book to, and seemed genuinely excited when I started reciting lines from certain poems and asking questions about them.

It felt really good man. Just felt like sharing that.

Offline Coryn

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Re: Writer Discussion Table
« Reply #1812 on: April 06, 2018, 11:36:28 PM »
That's a nice story bro. It's a shame how hard it can be to get published for the small independents. Sure, we got Amazon or whoever nowadays, but most people who go that route don't get anywhere because it's already so inundated that unless you know how to promote yourself or manage to go viral, you won't make wide distribution.

This is why I'm sticking to my plan of just getting good and getting accepted at an established publishing house. It's certainly harder, but worth the effort I feel, as I'm in no great hurry.

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Offline legomaestro

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Re: Writer Discussion Table
« Reply #1813 on: April 07, 2018, 06:19:27 PM »
Pretty good of you there Frono. Actually that's a philosophy that MRs supposed to run on: Read the hell out of someone elses stuff. When every raider does that then everyones' stories are getting read and much needed feedbac, then we are a happy group of campers getting the juice we need.

The Pareto Principle can be pretty depressing about this sort of stuff. 80% of everything is achieved by only 20% . So if you want to go to the merciless measuring stick of statistics, you've got to know that the most read and most published literature is a little, tiny niche, one fifth of ALL books published in the world. Which is a lot, until the principle screws you over and applies it to the AUTHORS that are actually read. You end up with a really, really small number and yeah you can forget that.

But it can also be encouraging. At least, in terms of your personal path as a writer. One fifth of the crappiest writing is your best. You find a way to see where you did good (or in the case of the poetry book if the author finds his best poems in his book) then you know the way forward in terms of improvement.

Believe, also, in karma. I don't ascribe to it, but it's a really healthy philosophy to read, comment and review whenever you have a chance, to support an author/artist/musician with whatever amount of money you can just because humans tend to be better off when they help one another - that that'll come back at you with a good veangeance.

Even though good reviews and support tend to be taken for granted, never go the other route and willingly ignore / throw a bad comment with no constructive criticism. You'd be surprised how nasty a simple 'ths sux' comment can be to anyone's comment.

Finally, if you want to be selfish about it all: Reading other works is the best way to know how much other people suck in comparision to you (Even though, in my case at least the numbers are mostly in the negative haha)


Offline Fronomenal

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Re: Writer Discussion Table
« Reply #1814 on: April 07, 2018, 11:06:36 PM »
@Coryn: Sounds like a good plan. Were there any specific publishing houses that you had in mind?

@Lego: Dude I'll admit, I feel guilty about not reviewing others work on here much. I mean the MR Canons are cool and fun, but I still need to show love to the other stories that the writers here pour their hearts into only to receive no form of review on them. Helping out my coworker definitely gave me a burst of inspiration to enact the change of helping others out more.

I also forgot to mention that my coworker pretty much gave up writing as a career after he wrote his first book (Although I'm pretty sure that could be easily guessed). Again, it sucks to hear something like that, but he seems to be at peace with his decision, which I understand and respect wholeheartedly. It was certainly cool to meet someone whose been through the process of publishing a book, though. Certainly helpful.