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Author Topic: Suuper's Tip Diary  (Read 217 times)

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Offline suuper-san

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Suuper's Tip Diary
« on: October 18, 2018, 07:18:35 AM »
Since it will be literally forever before I do any tutorials that I have promised over the years, I figured I would do a compromise and just use this thread as a diary of all the (very) little tips and things that I notice, primarily about my own art (which may not be useful to you guys), but also on techniques and guidelines and stuff. hopefully it's useful to someone :P

As obviously I am still a big learner, I can't guarantee that what I say is correct, but it seems correct to me at the time :P

I'll attempt to keep it organised in the first post here but it probably won't amount to much :P
(not sure if to double post with my first tip or not)

Natural poses and compound angles
Drawing shoulders
Drawing socks/thighhighs
« Last Edit: November 12, 2018, 05:45:06 PM by suuper-san »

Offline suuper-san

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Re: Suuper's Tip Diary
« Reply #1 on: October 18, 2018, 07:21:35 AM »
well, I did indeed double post :P

Something that I noticed is that mostly a person is quite fluid in lots of axis - they are very rarely fully symmetrical in a pose for example. when drawing a pose, you can use compound angles to get a more natural feel for the character. here's a sketch of what I mean. You can keep in mind that for almost any position, the wrists, ankles etc are free and can still rotate, so bear in mind the motion of the character and how they would position themselves.

It's good to double check a pose in real life to make sure it works!




Offline suuper-san

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Re: Suuper's Tip Diary
« Reply #2 on: October 24, 2018, 06:32:03 AM »
I've noticed that when drawing shoulders, they extend the same amount each way from the neck (obviously). this is still true at 3/4 view, but the neck itself and the head obscure part of the far shoulder, making it seems that it sticks out less. make sure to take this into account when drawing otherwise your far shoulder will be sticking out more. depending on the height of your view, the near shoulder will be higher (for a low angle), or lower (for a high angle) so keep in mind the vertical positions as well when drawing.

I've included a diagram that sort of explains it as well. top picture is birds eye view I think :P


Offline suuper-san

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Re: Suuper's Tip Diary
« Reply #3 on: November 12, 2018, 05:43:22 PM »
when drawing socks, thighhighs and so on, remember that the cross section is a circle. at an angle of course, it will be oval, but at the very edges, unless it is flat on the horizon line, the lines will be vertical. the curves should always be able to continue round to the hidden part at the back. drawing the whole thing in can help to get the curve right. drawing a plane through both legs can help to make sure the socks both reach up to the same height. In the picture where the legs are near to touching, the ovals of the top of the socks should also be close to touching

probably the worst ovals I have drawn in my life but there you go
« Last Edit: November 12, 2018, 05:46:25 PM by suuper-san »