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Author Topic: Digital Vs Traditional Art  (Read 5467 times)

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Offline MahluaandMilk

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Re: Digital Vs Traditional Art
« Reply #15 on: June 29, 2018, 06:33:33 PM »
I find digital harder to set up than traditional. I have to find my tablet, make sure it's plugged in, gotta find the pen, run some pressure tests, make sure the hotkeys work, gotta open the art program, gotta test to make sure it's working with the tablet, gotta reboot the computer sometimes if restarting the program doesn't work...

Have I mentioned that I have a very personal grudge against digital?

Offline Coach Fro

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Re: Digital Vs Traditional Art
« Reply #16 on: June 30, 2018, 07:02:59 PM »
What's it like drawing on a tablet compared to a traditional sketchbook? Does it feel smooth? Easy to work with? No differences at all really?
Messatsu...



Offline MahluaandMilk

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Re: Digital Vs Traditional Art
« Reply #17 on: June 30, 2018, 07:05:43 PM »
In my experience,

DEATH.


I hate working on tablets, man.

Offline MK

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Re: Digital Vs Traditional Art
« Reply #18 on: June 30, 2018, 07:45:26 PM »
@Fronomenal
I love my tablet so much more than traditional.  For sketching I use a thicker brush that way I can get nice shapes in quickly before I refine them down in details.  I'm using pretty much the cheapest wacom tablet but my lines are ctrl-z, ctrl-z, ctrl-z, ctrl-z, smooth.  At first it was really hard not drawing what you see but now ctrl-z, ctrl-z, it feels pretty easy.

@MahluaandMilk
Yet you seem to be drawing in digital all the time.  I think you can skip a lot of the tablet work if you just keep your tablet plugged in all the time (I actually got usb splitters for that reason).

Offline MahluaandMilk

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Re: Digital Vs Traditional Art
« Reply #19 on: June 30, 2018, 07:58:13 PM »
@MK My computer doesn't have that kind of power. Literally if I have my headset plugged in and I proceed to plug in my tablet, my headset stops working and the computer automatically switches back to inset output. The only reason I'm drawing so much in digital is because it's easier to share on the spot. I don't have a scanner, and my phone camera quality is garbage, plus I have to upload it to Google Drive, wait for it to sync to my laptop (which has taken literally DAYS before), and then I can post a traditional piece.

But honestly I'm starting to get so fed up with Krita and my tablet that I might just start going back to traditional anyway. Between my hardware not being anywhere near powerful enough to run a good art program and my tablet sometimes just not working and the software lagging all the time...it just sucks all the fun out of art, and if I can't enjoy the act of creation, then what's it supposed to mean to me?

Offline Suuper-san

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Re: Digital Vs Traditional Art
« Reply #20 on: July 01, 2018, 12:04:44 PM »
I honestly don't use Undo, like ever. Maybe once a drawing. I started drawing in pen so I would not have the option to erase, and get it right first time (like that ever worked)

I get what you mean about setting up time, although for casual sketching,I keep it simple, like I just use the same brush, ever. I dont even have the dialogs open, so I use single layer, same colour, same size etc. Just like a normal pen, really. So that means i probably prefer traditional because I am trying to use my tablet like a really expensive ballpoint pen T_T

@MK i get what you mean about the repeated undo before a good line. I experienced that a lot before I upgraded from my cheap tablet, probably because of the small work area, but possibly because of many things.

@mahlua sorry about the low power PC. Maybe an upgrade rather than a new one would be in order, although I can't say much about upgrading since I can only change a hard drive :P
youre best bet is to get something better soon if you can afford it, otherwise as you say, you lose time and fun.

"good art program", is incredibly objective although I totally know what you mean. try working at a lower resolution if you can stand the pixels, this will help your RAM usage, and may help to improve your speed. or try and find a free program that specializes in lower PC specs (even good old MS Paint might be worth a try). Many websites have optimization ideas for each program that you might use. I imagine you have tried a bunch of things already. I have even considered writing my own art program for at least 5 years now :P good workflow is also a help, like reducing layer count etc.

traditional is your best bet if its going hard, as paper and pen wont suddenly crash and you lose the last hour of work :P
but watch out for coffee cups @_@
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Offline MahluaandMilk

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Re: Digital Vs Traditional Art
« Reply #21 on: July 01, 2018, 02:12:46 PM »
Yeah, MSPaint never gave me any trouble. It's always those high end fancy-shmancy programs.That does give me an idea--to simply start working in MSPaint. (I swear I'm not being Lego's clone on purpose...)

I also don't rely as heavily on the undo tool unless there's a weird pen pressure or other kind of error. I just use the eraser tool to flesh things out better. Maybe it's because I'm also used to working with ballpoint pens and pigment liners for sketches. There's a certain value, I think, in challenging yourself to not use the undo command.

Offline drntreasre

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Re: Digital Vs Traditional Art
« Reply #22 on: November 11, 2018, 10:10:03 PM »
traditional is much better in my opinion and looks like it has much more work put into it

Offline Suuper-san

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Re: Digital Vs Traditional Art
« Reply #23 on: November 12, 2018, 02:52:10 AM »
I think using the eraser instead of undo makes the piece more natural, in a way. it depends a lot on the artist and it certainly can be a challenge to not use it. nowadays I do a lineart-cleaning phase with an eraser, and this in turn makes me feel more comfortable inking knowing that I'll be removing an mistakes later, so my lines are more fluid I think.

I have considered switching to MSPaint many a time, but I think the workflow I've got is quite suited to me and I dont want to mess it up haha.
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Offline ExiledSeries

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Re: Digital Vs Traditional Art
« Reply #24 on: December 24, 2019, 10:19:33 PM »
I like both digital and traditional as well. Both have many advantages and do look quite good. I've personally only done traditional (technology doesn't exactly agree with me as I'm still using a flip-phone in almost 2020), though I am experimenting another way of developing artwork for a project.

My apologies if this may sound confusing, but you know on the smartphones of those apps which makes your selfie look cartoon-ish? I've been toying this idea with my friend's older Android and the results of a couple selfies turned out very interesting. Imagine the animation from the Grand Theft Auto series, my idea which I would like to try out is developing a manga utilizing these cartoon-converted photos of each character. Now the fun part is instead of just drawing up a character we have added designing costumes for each character and actually bringing them to life by means of cosplay. We will be spending a few more months playing with this concept but it would be something different.

Offline Suuper-san

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Re: Digital Vs Traditional Art
« Reply #25 on: December 24, 2019, 11:51:49 PM »
I once saw (online) a studio-thing that set themselves up at a comic con style place, where you went into a photo booth and they took photos of you, edited the photos to look manga-ish and made you the protagonist of a short manga and printed it for you.
So it's totally an interesting style. It's limitations are that you stuck with a very realistic style, no matter how hard you edit the photos, but it's pros are that there are not limits as long as you can get a photo, and if you have a good setup, you can probably take photos and edit them faster than you can draw a panel from scratch.

as you say, you need an actual costume to make the character, so you have to go and make it, buy it etc, so that's a possible difficulty depending on your genre.

plus it's a completely different style and take on manga, so fresh ideas brings inspiration to everyone and experimentation is key to finding new ideas and methods
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Offline Hati

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Re: Digital Vs Traditional Art
« Reply #26 on: December 26, 2019, 02:42:48 PM »
While I do have a tablet now, I gotta say that I like traditional over digital.

I feel like I have more control  over shading and the pen. To me, the pen is an extension of myself. The tablet is also an extension of myself, but the main difference between the pen and the tablet is that the pen is already a part of my soul. I feel like if I were to get rid of all my pens and paints, that would be gouching a hole in my soul since I've used them for so long. To me, drawing is meditation, and to make it the best experience, the pens must stay.

What's nice about traditional is, you made it yourself. It is very hard for other people to copy and to replicate the pen and brush strokes, whereas in digital anyone can steal your art or modify it, that is if you're not careful. Once you finish a painting or a drawing, it's there physical in your hand, you do not need to go to Kinko's to get it printed.

Another thing about traditional art is you're supposed to make mistakes. I am a perfectionist, I like getting things right. But sometimes I color out of the lines, or I get the porportions wrong. Which is okay, because it's what makes your art unique. What I found is most of the time people don't see your mistakes. Which is why I feel like people should not be afraid to make mistakes because you're the only one who sees them!

Then again, some people just don't like making mistakes. Especially when you're a beginner, you want your art to be good so you can have something to be proud of. That's why so many people get frusterated when they do traditional art the first time because they expect it to be perfect. Those people then turn to digital because with digital, you can cover up mistakes in a flash.

I feel like begining artists should start with traditional first, just to see what they can do. Every single time you draw something, you learn something new. We draw not because it is easy, but because it is hard.

Even if you can't draw well (yet), start out with basics such as color theory, shapes, light, etc. With a tablet, you're just telling a machine on what you want to see.

Even though tablets last a long time, and people say they're cheaper than pens and pencils, I am skeptical of that. Since digital is becoming more popular, companies will start to raise prices. A handful of pens and pencils is only $12.99 and the price will start to decrease due to the popularity of tablets. It also depends on what medium you want to use. Like if you're into ceramics, your supplies will cost more than if you're just into pencils and paper. You don't  need the most expensive sketchbook or paints. Just buy whatever is there, use whatever you find on the ground. Because that is how you learn. And eventually, you'll find a brand that you really like. While, paper is expensive  (depends on the type and quality), there is always cheap brands that work like the real deal. And you don't need to buy paints every year. A set of watercolors can last a lifetime, and when a tube runs out, you can buy that specific tube on the brand's website. Really, all you need are the three primary colors red, blue, and yellow, and you're all set!

The thing that I've found is that if you keep drawing really well, and you show your art to other people (and they like it), then they'll start buying you art supplies! I'm not kidding. Like my aunties and uncles like my art so much,they kept giving me art supplies up to the point where I had to tell them that I have enough. So, it's possible that your art  might be that good.

I do see why traditional art is becoming less popular.

Firstly, it takes up a lot of space. And then it becomes a problem when you start to hoard paper. I have tons of containers for everything.

Secondly, there's complications on printing traditional art especially if you want t-shirts or books. Lithographers are becoming rarer and it's a lot of money to make prints at Kinko's.

Thirdly, when you scan traditional art, there's something about it that isn't the same. The color is somewhat faded, and the texture of the paper shows up, giving the ink a "dotted" effect.

And traditional art won't last forever. Hell, nothing does. But when you make it, it's in danger of weather changes, warping, smudging, and milk spilling. It's best to store somewhere safe, but what happens when you wanna show  it to other people? It could get harmed which is the problem.

That's why  I've turned to tablet as my backup. With tablet you can easily edit without erasing anything you want to keep, and the color does not fade. With tablet, the art will always stay the same, and the art can be easily printed and reproduced.

I have my tablet because I know in the future if I want to make art as my job, this is what clients will want.
I still have my pen, but I have learned to use the tablet and admire the art it can make.

Anyway, that's just my two bits.

Offline Suuper-san

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Re: Digital Vs Traditional Art
« Reply #27 on: December 26, 2019, 03:59:18 PM »
Nice thoughts there :P

That's a fair point that your traditional art is more safer, I hadn't thought of it like that. But a photo/scan of your art is just as at risk once it makes it's way online so there's always that to worry about haha

That's a true thing about mistakes, pretty much only other artists will notice, and there's not many of them in an average group of people.
As you say, it probably isn't possible to avoid mistakes but you can make them smaller. I remember a Kim Jung Gi video and he's drawing in front of a class and says "oh, I just made a few mistakes". But we'd never know because he's good enough to hide them and make the mistakes smaller or turn them into something else. As Bob Ross would say, a "happy little accident" XD

I also agree beginners should start with traditional. I think the absolute core of art lies there.

I would say that traditional is cheaper as well. But it depends, if you use paints or oils, then the price is probably quite high, buying canvasses etc. I use cheap pens and paper so my traditional cost is very low. So it depends on a lot on your personal setup I think. Either way, it's possible to work cheaper or more expensively in both traditional and digital if you want XD

I have also had people buy me art supplies, often things I didn't need, so yes that is true as well.

I have several thousand A4 pages of my drawings in 7 or more ring binders, which weigh a ton and take up a lot of space. compared to my digital which take up nothing. Plus tools and so on, can take up a lot of space if you're not careful and selective in what you buy and use. I can;t imagine a painter's room with canvasses and stuff XD

I thought the texture of the paper showing in a digital scan was good? I was always under the impression that the texture of the paper adds to the drawing in a lot of cases?
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Offline Hati

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Re: Digital Vs Traditional Art
« Reply #28 on: December 26, 2019, 05:39:57 PM »
There's nothing wrong with texture of paper, but when you put the image as like an icon or upload it to a website with a megabyte limit then, it destroys the quality of the scan. That's what I meant when I said "dotted".

Also, depending on the paper texture, the coarser the texture is, the faster your pens will retire. For me I no longer use high-textured watercolor paper and turn to less textured paper (like multi-media Straftmore paper). The nice thing about traditional art is you can change the supplies and paper to get what you want. And once you find something you like, you don't have to spend as much money ;)

Offline Suuper-san

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Re: Digital Vs Traditional Art
« Reply #29 on: December 27, 2019, 12:45:01 AM »
ahhh i see. You mean image compression dots? like jpeg artifacts? or just low resolution pixellation?
it can take a bit of playing to get a scan to look as good as it does in real life. I've only worked with linearts mostly which are a lot easier to convert to digital.
yeah super absorbent paper will certainly use up your pens haha. I use super dirt cheap resources so £5 will last me a whole year XD
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