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Author Topic: Digital Vs Traditional Art  (Read 549 times)

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Offline GalaxyDreamer90

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Digital Vs Traditional Art
« on: June 25, 2018, 05:26:32 PM »
I'm just curious what is everyone's preference digital or traditional art and why. I'm just asking this for fun so no mean comments please. For me now that I've found a good program for digital art, which was recommended to me by one of my teachers, I am finding myself preferring digital art all of a sudden. I'm even thinking now after I graduate from college getting rid of my art supplies since I seem to be going all digital with my art. Here are some reasons I prefer digital art over traditional.
1. Just as creative and expressive as traditional art.
I have found that I can Express myself just as good if not even better through digital art as traditional art.
2. No mess, no chemicals, and all your tools are in one place.
3. Last Longer.
Traditional art tends to fade away with time while with digital art as long as you back up your work it will last longer.
4. The way of the future.
 I may be wrong but I believe digital art may be the art of the future.

Offline MahluaandMilk

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Re: Digital Vs Traditional Art
« Reply #1 on: June 25, 2018, 05:42:21 PM »
Both have their perks. It really depends on the look and feel of what you're going for and what speaks more to you. I feel like I can explore more with traditional media, personally. I grew up with crayons and colored pencils, and later moved onto markers and ink. I've only started digital recently, and although there are a lot of perks to it, I feel like it's so much more of a hassle. Sure, there's a lot more you can do with it, a lot more feels and flavors you can create and toy with, and so many extra tools and whatnot...but it can be overwhelming, and I find myself far less willing to put the first lines down because it's so pristine, you know?

I can pick up a pen anywhere and just doodle on a scrap of paper and it doesn't feel at all restrictive. I worry so much less about making mistakes, and get less frustrated with the mistakes I do make. I guess that happens when you do traditional media for basically the first like, eighteen years of your life almost.

Offline suupertramp

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Re: Digital Vs Traditional Art
« Reply #2 on: June 25, 2018, 06:07:43 PM »
for me personally:

sketching - digital = traditional
colouring - digital > traditional
lineart - traditional > digital
cost (for me) - digital > traditional (tablet vs. ballpoint)
time - digital = traditional (but i wont colour traditional)
accuracy of drawing - traditional > digital
accuracy of layout - digital > traditional (because i dont use a real ruler but i do use digital margins etc)
editing - digital > traditional (Ctr-Z vs. eraser/tipex)
portability - traditional > digital
creativity - digital > traditional (i'm thinking importing textures etc.)

I love my cheap ballpoint pen but digital has a lot to offer that I can't ignore. I mostly draw digital indoors and traditional outdoors or travelling/holiday.

Offline GalaxyDreamer90

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Re: Digital Vs Traditional Art
« Reply #3 on: June 25, 2018, 06:27:46 PM »
Both have their perks. It really depends on the look and feel of what you're going for and what speaks more to you. I feel like I can explore more with traditional media, personally. I grew up with crayons and colored pencils, and later moved onto markers and ink. I've only started digital recently, and although there are a lot of perks to it, I feel like it's so much more of a hassle. Sure, there's a lot more you can do with it, a lot more feels and flavors you can create and toy with, and so many extra tools and whatnot...but it can be overwhelming, and I find myself far less willing to put the first lines down because it's so pristine, you know?

I can pick up a pen anywhere and just doodle on a scrap of paper and it doesn't feel at all restrictive. I worry so much less about making mistakes, and get less frustrated with the mistakes I do make. I guess that happens when you do traditional media for basically the first like, eighteen years of your life almost.

I do agree there is a learning curve to going from traditional to digital art.  However since I started drawing in middle school I wanted to eventually learn digital art. I guess that's why I eventually decided to become a graphic design student. Now I'm learning how to work with programs such as photoshop.

Offline MahluaandMilk

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Re: Digital Vs Traditional Art
« Reply #4 on: June 25, 2018, 06:54:42 PM »
I used to have Photoshop. Oddly enough the only program that lets me feel even close to at home as I do with traditional media is Microsoft Paint. I currently use Krita because I'm broke af, so maybe that's contributing to my issues, but...man, I don't think it's the learning curve so much as I just really don't like working digitally. I've been doing it for months now and I still kinda hate it, if I'm being honest.

But then again, it's kind of the same thing between me writing things by hand or writing them on a word processor. I have a harder time writing on a word processor. When I'm just writing on a notepad or in a notebook or even on scrap paper, I feel more free to write anything. My ideas come through a lot more easily. That's why I've mostly settled on doing my plot planning and organizing on paper before typing the whole story in a word processor.

I could try the same for digital art, but I don't have a scanner and my phone camera does not pick up my pencil or even my ink marks clearly enough to work with. I would have to go through a lineart phase twice, which is pretty annoying.

Offline GalaxyDreamer90

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Re: Digital Vs Traditional Art
« Reply #5 on: June 25, 2018, 09:39:40 PM »
I was recommended to try sketchbook pro, which is now completely free, by my teacher. I have tried it and it feels much more like drawing on paper and for me wasnt as much of a learning curve as photoshop. I still have photoshop though since I need it for school ATM. I cant really understand not liking digital art that much, but then again I'm a graphic design student. The only problem I had with digital art was finding the right program and and learning my way around it. Oh and there's also the cost, but traditional art can be expensive too so either way there is the cost.

Offline MahluaandMilk

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Re: Digital Vs Traditional Art
« Reply #6 on: June 25, 2018, 10:11:31 PM »
I hate working with new programs. You don't have that problem working in traditional media either. If you get a new 2b pencil, nothing is moved around. Nothing is really particularly different. It may or may not have an eraser. It may be a slightly different lead value. But it's still a pencil. It will behave like a pencil. Art programs? There's no consistency. I found Photoshop far easier to manage than Krita, and the learning curve of trying any new program, be it Sketchbook Pro or anything else out there, would frustrate me to no end and I do not appreciate being barred from just having fun. It's more like each individual art program is its own media, and I just do not have the patience to switch and learn new media when that's not the point of what I'm trying to do. I picked up marker because I wanted to, not because my colored pencils expired, went out of stock, or had to be updated.

That isn't to say that I hate all digital art programs or that any other program can achieve the same results as another. Traditional media will almost never look like digital media, and digital media can only imitate the appearance of traditional media. MSPaint will never really look like Photoshop, although Photoshop has options to look like MSPaint. Digital is far more versatile due to its power to mimic.

It's just how programs behave that bother me. My broke ass who ain't got enough money for first month's rent at the end of July don't have the money to upgrade my old Windows 7 laptop to something that can handle big canvases and make digital art look good either--because it's not just the programs. The hardware and stuff that adds to the complication. With traditional, you have your media, and that's your hardware. Digital adds software as a middle-man. And boy, can that middle man screw you over.

All in all, I can have more fun with a mechanical pencil I found on the sidewalk that ain't got half an eraser left, a ballpoint pen someone dropped in front of the library, and old sketchbook, and it's so much less of a headache.

To top it off, there's no troubleshooting required with traditional. Pencil not working? Sharpen it. Pen not working? Probably out of ink. Scribble a bit and see if it comes back. Paper acting up? Stop erasing so much over that one area. Or maybe you got cardstock or watercolor grade paper and you're only using pencil. The reasons why things aren't working is usually obvious. With my tablet, however, sometimes I'll plug it in and the driver will do a test and it looks like pressure's working fine but Krita won't differentiate pressure and the hotkeys are messed up despite the fact that the driver says they're okay. Happens about 1 in every 20 or so plug-ins. I can't imagine a world where a pencil only creates different value on paper for no apparent reason only 19 out of every 20 times it's used, but with digital. Meh. That's just to be expected.

Offline suupertramp

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Re: Digital Vs Traditional Art
« Reply #7 on: June 26, 2018, 04:36:50 AM »
true about technical difficulties. one time an app updated to a v2 kinda thing and i just couldnt get the same feel back when I drew. I still use it, but not as much.
yeah pens are easy to troubleshoot :P

Offline MK

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Re: Digital Vs Traditional Art
« Reply #8 on: June 26, 2018, 05:38:17 AM »
I like digital better because of the versatility of colors and that I'm bad at traditional XD

Offline Walter B

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Re: Digital Vs Traditional Art
« Reply #9 on: June 29, 2018, 05:57:52 AM »
I find that I have better control at traditional and the lineart is better. However, digital certainly beats traditional when it ocmes to coloring. It just goes 10 times faster since you can apply solid colors to a big area in a second and then just add some basic shading.

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Offline legomaestro

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Re: Digital Vs Traditional Art
« Reply #10 on: June 29, 2018, 08:19:44 AM »
Suuper's mathematical summary of every situation is pretty much it for me.

There's one thing to know as well about digital: That whole zooming in and out thing? It's a concept that only exists in digital. Traditional your canvas is always there before you. Sure you can lean in and out but it's just not the same. Detail has to be achieved in another manner.

The lack of the tactile response between your hand, instrument and surface that you're working on? Rarely if not ever there in digital as well. So while I'll always use digital and I'd love to learn a little more about how to use 3d software and the like, traditional will always have a place in my heart.


Offline suupertramp

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Re: Digital Vs Traditional Art
« Reply #11 on: June 29, 2018, 09:15:34 AM »
@lego yeah the zooming is a plus and a minus. you can lose sense of scale and end up adding too much detail in one go. But you get much sharper images a lot easier. too difficult to draw? just zoom in and draw it bigger!

I also agree about the slight delay when using digital. You do get used to it, but you always notice it every now and again and it becomes not natural again, kinda like your own blinking or breathing when you become aware of it:P

Offline legomaestro

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Re: Digital Vs Traditional Art
« Reply #12 on: June 29, 2018, 09:19:23 AM »
Dammit man, you know that's a low blow. Now I'm breathing manually again : (

Oh man I've seen some insane canvas sizes done by pro digital artists for precisely that. It's pretty dope. 

Offline Lord Kesashi

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Re: Digital Vs Traditional Art
« Reply #13 on: June 29, 2018, 03:31:37 PM »
As someone who is primarily a traditional artist there is nothing I want more in life than to be able to press ctrl+z.

Offline Ryan

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Re: Digital Vs Traditional Art
« Reply #14 on: June 29, 2018, 06:00:58 PM »
While I do think there are benefits to each, I'm just way too lazy for most traditional art. Setting things up? I'll never get started on anything, haha. I live on my computer so digital is much more natural for me.