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Author Topic: How is a fighting scene supposed to fleshed out in a novel?  (Read 63 times)

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Offline YoUr EyEs

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How is a fighting scene supposed to fleshed out in a novel?
« on: November 14, 2017, 11:40:42 AM »
I recently started to write and things got complicated, I cannot seem to be able to flesh out a fighting scene or even an action packed one.
I would like to know, how am I supposed to write one?

« Last Edit: November 14, 2017, 11:44:47 AM by YoUr EyEs »

Offline Forlorn Serpent

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Re: How is a fighting scene supposed to fleshed out in a novel?
« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2017, 03:02:38 PM »
Jesus Christ. The girl in the gif is cute as f***

Anyway. First describe the location, and what the fighters are doing before the fight. So wide description. Once the fight starts, focus on what each fighter is doing as he or she affects another fighter. The writing should move the action and story, not slow it down with exposition.

Also, during the fight, use short sentences. It makes the action read faster. which makes it more enjoyable. So no prose during this part.

Offline YoUr EyEs

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Re: How is a fighting scene supposed to fleshed out in a novel?
« Reply #2 on: November 14, 2017, 03:28:52 PM »
It is SuA from Dreamcatcher, I luv their group~!

I have never written a story, I am not sure if I can actually flesh it out. I think I understand what you are saying but, do I have to write every action made? For example, " 1 throw a high kick to 2 but, it was dodged easily and countered with an uppercut."



I am not sure if this would make any sense...


Offline Forlorn Serpent

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Re: How is a fighting scene supposed to fleshed out in a novel?
« Reply #3 on: November 14, 2017, 04:01:27 PM »
The reader can fill in the mundane fight actions scenes. But, anything epic a fighter does, should be written.

For example.

Aaa ran towards a thousand man army. Each soldier stood steadfast, waiting for him to get close enough to counter his strikes.

Aaa noticed a ramp aligned next to the cliff that surrounded the army. He parkoured up, taking out several smoke bombs from his pockets and threw them within the army.

The soldiers gasped for air. The smoke was poison. Soldier after soldier fell, leaving their eyes bleeding.

“Watch your breath!” Cried the soldiers.

A light glare moved across Aaa unsheathed sword. As the soldiers were distracted trying to find safe air to breath, Aaa maneuvered between them, slicing their necks and stabbing their chest.

Blood colored the floor. The army’s numbers dropped as the the screams died down.

Aaa, single handled defeated the army.

- - -


This could be better. I’m doing this on my phone.

Offline MadOxMalachi

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Re: How is a fighting scene supposed to fleshed out in a novel?
« Reply #4 on: November 15, 2017, 07:55:02 AM »
The reader can fill in the mundane fight actions scenes. But, anything epic a fighter does, should be written.

For example.

Aaa ran towards a thousand man army. Each soldier stood steadfast, waiting for him to get close enough to counter his strikes.

Aaa noticed a ramp aligned next to the cliff that surrounded the army. He parkoured up, taking out several smoke bombs from his pockets and threw them within the army.

The soldiers gasped for air. The smoke was poison. Soldier after soldier fell, leaving their eyes bleeding.

“Watch your breath!” Cried the soldiers.

A light glare moved across Aaa unsheathed sword. As the soldiers were distracted trying to find safe air to breath, Aaa maneuvered between them, slicing their necks and stabbing their chest.

Blood colored the floor. The army’s numbers dropped as the the screams died down.

Aaa, single handled defeated the army.

- - -


This could be better. I’m doing this on my phone.
:clapping:

Offline YoUr EyEs

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Re: How is a fighting scene supposed to fleshed out in a novel?
« Reply #5 on: November 15, 2017, 10:34:04 AM »
The reader can fill in the mundane fight actions scenes. But, anything epic a fighter does, should be written.

For example.

Aaa ran towards a thousand man army. Each soldier stood steadfast, waiting for him to get close enough to counter his strikes.

Aaa noticed a ramp aligned next to the cliff that surrounded the army. He parkoured up, taking out several smoke bombs from his pockets and threw them within the army.

The soldiers gasped for air. The smoke was poison. Soldier after soldier fell, leaving their eyes bleeding.

“Watch your breath!” Cried the soldiers.

A light glare moved across Aaa unsheathed sword. As the soldiers were distracted trying to find safe air to breath, Aaa maneuvered between them, slicing their necks and stabbing their chest.

Blood colored the floor. The army’s numbers dropped as the the screams died down.

Aaa, single handled defeated the army.

- - -


This could be better. I’m doing this on my phone.


I think that I understand!
Very nice text for an example~!
Thank you~

Offline araithiel

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Re: How is a fighting scene supposed to fleshed out in a novel?
« Reply #6 on: November 15, 2017, 10:44:07 AM »
Hmm I suppose it would depend on what kind of fight scene you're describing, be it something large or something small. And also on where you're really struggling.

More importantly, writing a fight scene needs to be appropriate to both your personal style, and to the story itself. In something a little lighter and more comedic, it's not incredibly important to describe specific attacks in perfect detail. Or, if your story is really over the top, it again doesn't matter. You could see it through things like Dragonball versus Dragonball Z, where it goes from intimate martial arts moves and tournaments to just "look at this big ass spirit bomb! I can yell louder than you!!!" and their technique and training is out the window. Or History's Strongest Disciple Kenichi is all about techniques, moves, and execution, so it's very important it describes those things accurately and believably. One Piece doesn't care about that, so set pieces, character interactions, and the stakes are all more important than the actual fight, at which point Luffy can literally make up a move and nobody cares cause it's awesome.

So that would be my first bit of advice.

Second, any fight is just an extension of a conversation or an argument. It's a debate between two people, and debates always have larger things at stake. Fighting for the sake of fighting isn't very interesting. A fight scene to introduce a badass fighting character or show off their skills isn't really captivating or impressive or fun for the readers, regardless of how interesting it is written (there is a ceiling you can break on that but it has to be really damn impressive with spectacular art). So the other thing to remember is to focus on all the things going into the fight. Why are they fighting? What happens if X loses? What happens if they win? Why might they use certain attacks over others? Why don't they run? Why don't they try something different? How do they feel? And so on.

This extends into during the fight as well. Between action lines, characters can speak to continue their fight. They can also react and feel and panic and other things can happen. They can take the time to observe surroundings. Things are shifting around them, and they need to be described too.

Action scenes do have a major pitfall in that at their heart, they're super short. Like it or not, they're very quick in the written word. In manga, they can be really drawn out because they can do bitching poses that take up an entire page, or they can wind up for a punch, wait a moment, show a reaction shot from the audience, then punch, whereas that might be just a sentence in written word. Or, much like that manga example, you can cut away for reaction shots or other descriptions of what's going on.

So that's all my advice on things around fighting, without describing how one even writes out the specifics of a fight scene. Cause I don't find that part to be hard. So long as you can imagine (or doodle out with stick figures) what's happening, you can just write it down beat for beat. It's all the surrounding stuff that you have to remember.
@nick on Wattpad

Offline YoUr EyEs

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Re: How is a fighting scene supposed to fleshed out in a novel?
« Reply #7 on: November 15, 2017, 11:09:26 AM »
Hmm I suppose it would depend on what kind of fight scene you're describing, be it something large or something small. And also on where you're really struggling.

Like I said, it is the first time that I will try to write a novel, I cannot really point out where I am struggling.

More importantly, writing a fight scene needs to be appropriate to both your personal style, and to the story itself. In something a little lighter and more comedic, it's not incredibly important to describe specific attacks in perfect detail. Or, if your story is really over the top, it again doesn't matter. You could see it through things like Dragonball versus Dragonball Z, where it goes from intimate martial arts moves and tournaments to just "look at this big ass spirit bomb! I can yell louder than you!!!" and their technique and training is out the window. Or History's Strongest Disciple Kenichi is all about techniques, moves, and execution, so it's very important it describes those things accurately and believably. One Piece doesn't care about that, so set pieces, character interactions, and the stakes are all more important than the actual fight, at which point Luffy can literally make up a move and nobody cares cause it's awesome.

I doubt that it would feature any kind of long fighthing scenes, more like "realistic" ones, but, I can see what you are saying here and it make sense~

Second, any fight is just an extension of a conversation or an argument. It's a debate between two people, and debates always have larger things at stake. Fighting for the sake of fighting isn't very interesting. A fight scene to introduce a badass fighting character or show off their skills isn't really captivating or impressive or fun for the readers, regardless of how interesting it is written (there is a ceiling you can break on that but it has to be really damn impressive with spectacular art). So the other thing to remember is to focus on all the things going into the fight. Why are they fighting? What happens if X loses? What happens if they win? Why might they use certain attacks over others? Why don't they run? Why don't they try something different? How do they feel? And so on.

Yes, something has to be at stakes, without anything or hype a fight scene would just be plain and useless at most.


Action scenes do have a major pitfall in that at their heart, they're super short. Like it or not, they're very quick in the written word. In manga, they can be really drawn out because they can do bitching poses that take up an entire page, or they can wind up for a punch, wait a moment, show a reaction shot from the audience, then punch, whereas that might be just a sentence in written word. Or, much like that manga example, you can cut away for reaction shots or other descriptions of what's going on.


I usually draw but, for some reason I hardly had any time to keep drawing so, I thought that I should try writing and I realised how much differences that was between both, I find drawing to be more easier since you can add more expressions and reaction/actions.

Thank you, I will keep your advices in mind~

Offline araithiel

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Re: How is a fighting scene supposed to fleshed out in a novel?
« Reply #8 on: November 15, 2017, 11:17:43 AM »

I usually draw but, for some reason I hardly had any time to keep drawing so, I thought that I should try writing and I realised how much differences that was between both, I find drawing to be more easier since you can add more expressions and reaction/actions.


Well, that's true at first, but writing you can do all the same things, and should. Focus in on their expressions, and their thoughts. Drawing can do a good job of expressing visual emotion and feats, writing has its strength in being able to explore thoughts and emotions infinitely (whereas drawing is confined to smaller thought boxes)
@nick on Wattpad

Offline YoUr EyEs

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Re: How is a fighting scene supposed to fleshed out in a novel?
« Reply #9 on: November 15, 2017, 11:38:06 AM »
Well, that's true at first, but writing you can do all the same things, and should. Focus in on their expressions, and their thoughts. Drawing can do a good job of expressing visual emotion and feats, writing has its strength in being able to explore thoughts and emotions infinitely (whereas drawing is confined to smaller thought boxes)


Well it isn't really confined in a smaller box, with the expressions, movements and reaction that a character is drawn with, you can more or less say a lot just by drawing a single panel.