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Author Topic: Different strokes  (Read 1533 times)

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Offline okarutikku

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Different strokes
« on: June 22, 2016, 02:26:56 PM »
I read through a few threads and noticed everyone seems to have there own unique workflow like most creative arts :)

What products would one want to acquire to imitate these two very famous artists,

Shintaro kago,

toshio Saeki,

???

Any help would be welcome. I'm very new to the craft so knowing what the right tools are for the job would be a huge 1up in saving time and money being a sound guy if that makes sense :)

Offline MK

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Re: Different strokes
« Reply #1 on: June 23, 2016, 04:05:11 AM »
I mean it really depends on what you want to do.  I'm pretty sure they are both traditional artists especially with their age kept in mind.  Digital art is pretty much taking over many aspects simply because of the undo button but I don't think tools are what you need.  If you want to copy a style then you just need to practice that style of drawing rather than the tools they have.

I looked them up very briefly and it just looks like Shintaro Kago uses a G-pen and Toshio Saeki uses paint.  Truthfully I think a pencil and maybe a G-pen is all you really need to get started.  If you wanted color then acrylic is much easier and faster to dry. 

In the long run traditional is more expensive but for digital all you really need is a tablet and a computer.

Offline okarutikku

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Re: Different strokes
« Reply #2 on: June 23, 2016, 08:59:13 AM »
I really appreciate your advice, I went out and bought a cheap sketch pad and a small set of pencils to get started. After what you said I thought it be stupid of me to spend allot of money considering I can't draw very well or even copy at this stage.

Thanks again

:)

Offline Ryan

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Re: Different strokes
« Reply #3 on: June 26, 2016, 12:59:12 AM »
I really appreciate your advice, I went out and bought a cheap sketch pad and a small set of pencils to get started. After what you said I thought it be stupid of me to spend allot of money considering I can't draw very well or even copy at this stage.

Thanks again

:)

That's a good start! I wouldn't recommend nib pens(G-pen) for quite a while. I got some when I was a beginner a couple years ago and I haven't touched them since. You need to use certain paper with them for them to work well, and it's honestly not really worth learning to use them unless you really want to be a comic artist, for that reason.

The basics to recognize in terms of media related to the artists you selected are this:
thickness of the tip, and fast ink-flow medium

Spoiler

In this image, there are big 'shapes' of pure black, i.e. contained areas of pure black. Areas like that are best filled with large/wide-tipped medium.

That's one side of the scale. The other side are fine-tipped medium. I'm going to recommend fineliners, a.k.a. art pens/pigment pens for this.
This is an example, but there are many.

These two tools should be sufficient for creating the works you see in terms of the finished output, more-so for toshio saeki than shintaro kago. Shintaro will be a lot more difficult to do.

One more thing worth mentioning is, if you are to fill large areas of black, you outline that large area first with the fine-tipped medium. You fill it with the fat-tip medium later since it is harder to control and get precise, crisp shapes. Unless you are doodling/sketching, you can be less precise in such cases.

One last tip: Don't be dense. You can't draw thin lines with thick-tip'd drawing tools. Tools are just that, tools. But, you need to be in the ballpark of what's being done in their style if you want any chance at all. I'm not saying to be uptight or strict, but be sensible about it. Then, you can focus on acquiring the technique and skill. Good luck.

Offline okarutikku

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Re: Different strokes
« Reply #4 on: June 26, 2016, 04:03:48 PM »
I really appreciate your advice, I went out and bought a cheap sketch pad and a small set of pencils to get started. After what you said I thought it be stupid of me to spend allot of money considering I can't draw very well or even copy at this stage.

Thanks again

:)

That's a good start! I wouldn't recommend nib pens(G-pen) for quite a while. I got some when I was a beginner a couple years ago and I haven't touched them since. You need to use certain paper with them for them to work well, and it's honestly not really worth learning to use them unless you really want to be a comic artist, for that reason.

The basics to recognize in terms of media related to the artists you selected are this:
thickness of the tip, and fast ink-flow medium

Spoiler

In this image, there are big 'shapes' of pure black, i.e. contained areas of pure black. Areas like that are best filled with large/wide-tipped medium.

That's one side of the scale. The other side are fine-tipped medium. I'm going to recommend fineliners, a.k.a. art pens/pigment pens for this.
This is an example, but there are many.

These two tools should be sufficient for creating the works you see in terms of the finished output, more-so for toshio saeki than shintaro kago. Shintaro will be a lot more difficult to do.

One more thing worth mentioning is, if you are to fill large areas of black, you outline that large area first with the fine-tipped medium. You fill it with the fat-tip medium later since it is harder to control and get precise, crisp shapes. Unless you are doodling/sketching, you can be less precise in such cases.

One last tip: Don't be dense. You can't draw thin lines with thick-tip'd drawing tools. Tools are just that, tools. But, you need to be in the ballpark of what's being done in their style if you want any chance at all. I'm not saying to be uptight or strict, but be sensible about it. Then, you can focus on acquiring the technique and skill. Good luck.

Thanks for the recommendation and detailed examples :)

Do you think a set of sharpie markers and a decent fine point would cut it for practice ie sketching learning how to use the tools?

I just don't understand the coloring process in regards to toshios work, it's so clean cut and perfect it doesn't look like paint it almost looks digital but for obvious reasons isn't.



Offline MK

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Re: Different strokes
« Reply #5 on: June 27, 2016, 04:18:47 AM »
I've used acrylic paint before and the way you get everything a consistent color is by layering each section several times.  As for pens...  Truthfully getting used to a gpen will always be difficult for people.  There are pros who do everything with micron pens and can't even use a gpen.  It really depends on the artist and what they practiced with.

Anyways, you shouldn't really care about what pens you use because a good artist can do fine with cheap materials.  Most of the skill from being an artist is more of the anatomy rather than their line work.
Great anatomy with decent line art>perfect line art and bad anatomy
A couple people might notice some mistakes in line art but everyone will notice if a character is missing a body part

Offline Ryan

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Re: Different strokes
« Reply #6 on: June 28, 2016, 10:47:51 PM »
I really appreciate your advice, I went out and bought a cheap sketch pad and a small set of pencils to get started. After what you said I thought it be stupid of me to spend allot of money considering I can't draw very well or even copy at this stage.

Thanks again

:)

That's a good start! I wouldn't recommend nib pens(G-pen) for quite a while. I got some when I was a beginner a couple years ago and I haven't touched them since. You need to use certain paper with them for them to work well, and it's honestly not really worth learning to use them unless you really want to be a comic artist, for that reason.

The basics to recognize in terms of media related to the artists you selected are this:
thickness of the tip, and fast ink-flow medium

Spoiler

In this image, there are big 'shapes' of pure black, i.e. contained areas of pure black. Areas like that are best filled with large/wide-tipped medium.

That's one side of the scale. The other side are fine-tipped medium. I'm going to recommend fineliners, a.k.a. art pens/pigment pens for this.
This is an example, but there are many.

These two tools should be sufficient for creating the works you see in terms of the finished output, more-so for toshio saeki than shintaro kago. Shintaro will be a lot more difficult to do.

One more thing worth mentioning is, if you are to fill large areas of black, you outline that large area first with the fine-tipped medium. You fill it with the fat-tip medium later since it is harder to control and get precise, crisp shapes. Unless you are doodling/sketching, you can be less precise in such cases.

One last tip: Don't be dense. You can't draw thin lines with thick-tip'd drawing tools. Tools are just that, tools. But, you need to be in the ballpark of what's being done in their style if you want any chance at all. I'm not saying to be uptight or strict, but be sensible about it. Then, you can focus on acquiring the technique and skill. Good luck.

Thanks for the recommendation and detailed examples :)

Do you think a set of sharpie markers and a decent fine point would cut it for practice ie sketching learning how to use the tools?

I just don't understand the coloring process in regards to toshios work, it's so clean cut and perfect it doesn't look like paint it almost looks digital but for obvious reasons isn't.

Yeah, those should be fine for now. Draw a lot with the pencil too.

Toshio's works are prints, I believe. Basically what you see here. https://youtu.be/xI4b8StOECk?t=5m24s