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Author Topic: Vampires, and Their Many Representations.  (Read 1343 times)

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Offline 50 Words for Paipis

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Re: Vampires, and Their Many Representations.
« Reply #15 on: March 24, 2017, 09:41:54 PM »
Dracula, according to many critics, was always supposed to be sexual. The book has that one scene where the female vampires try to suck blood from Jonathan Harker and he gets real uncomfortable for more than one reason. It seem there is debate over exactly what the book has to say about sexuality (many consider it a warning tale), but it seems to be there. I imagine it's because the neck, though not as much today, has historically been shown off in a sort of sexual way, like the legs. Also, it is a place of intimacy and the "bite," a kind of penetration, lends to a feeling of sexual violation. Given that the book was written when Freud was active and popular, it's certainly plausible that this was the line of thinking. To me, there are similarities between Dracula and Don Giovanni from the Mozart opera of the same name who basically goes around using his influence to either seduce or rape women.

But, yeah, then there was Murnau's Nosferatu and Browning's Dracula and, like that, Dracula was a part of pop culture, with parodies such as Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein (in which they also meet Dracula) and The Count from Sesame Street, b-movies such as Billy the Kid vs. Dracula, all of which both/either blurred Dracula's previous meaning and/or softened his image a bit. Basically, what the vampire was previously was now fair game. To some degree, the sexual vampire persisted, but there were more representations of the vampire present.

Given that us amateur writers like to write stories where the dragon is good (because dragons are cool af) and the main character is a half-blood whatever (because they need to be edgy but not too edgy) and rely on a pop culture knowledge of things, it is very possible that stuff like Twilight was written only having met Dracula in a Scooby Doo special. Or, rather, how the vampire was going to be portrayed was likely decided in Stephanie Meyer's mind before she did any research. Used because the vampire is cool and not because the vampire represents anything (not that there is anything wrong with that; as I said, the vampire is fair game).

Also, given the whole Hot Topic phenomenon, it was only a matter of time before vampire media started catering more specifically to that crowd— younger, hornier, the logical audience for high school settings and steamy romance scenes.

Personally, I'm partial to the darker depictions. Dracula is pretty heckin' scary, mainly in that he almost always gets what he wants. The Harkers, Van Helsing, and the gang fail against him several times before they finally get him. And the whole thing with the ship and the guy in the mental institution as Dracula is traveling to England. And Nosferatu which takes out the sexual elements in favor of an almost apocalyptic vision of the vampire. And Dreyer's Vampyr which focuses on the occult aspects. And Silus from The Graveyard Book who's a stoic protector of the MC.
« Last Edit: March 24, 2017, 09:44:43 PM by 50 Words for Paipis »

Offline MahluaandMilk

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Re: Vampires, and Their Many Representations.
« Reply #16 on: March 24, 2017, 10:08:14 PM »
That's a pretty neat interpretation all around, OhGod, although like Paipis, my more traditionalist mindset makes me want to perk up and adjust a few things, but it's your story, and I'll grant you the liberties you have the right to. (Except I have a dying need to point out that Carmilla takes place in Austria and was written by an Irishman...and the titular character was kinda killed at the end.)

But yes, there's not a doubt in my mind that Dracula was intended to be sexual. Hell, Carmilla was as well.

As a bit of a traditionalist, as I said, it kinda saddens me that when you Google "Carmilla" you can find some really badly written YouTube show spin-off. I try to pretend it doesn't exist. I even watched some of it, but nope. Bad idea. Ruined one of my favorite short stories. Not appreciating.

I'd like to see a vampire story where they go back to their more viscous and, you know, undead ways. I don't want a pretty vampire trying to find humanity, I don't want some school drama that tries to be hot because vampires that completely glosses over how traumatic the blood thing is—I want something raw. Of course, I don't mean anyone here who is writing anything else offense. So far, everyone's ideas and contributions have been fresh and insightful. I'm just adding more than two cents.
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Offline OhGodHelpMe

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Re: Vampires, and Their Many Representations.
« Reply #17 on: March 24, 2017, 10:25:07 PM »
Oh thank god, I almost watched that show because it was the first thing that popped up  :ohmy: I'll take your word for it and avoid it like the plague

Offline MahluaandMilk

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Re: Vampires, and Their Many Representations.
« Reply #18 on: March 24, 2017, 11:14:24 PM »
My problem with it is that it's mindnumbingly predictable and so cliché it's like they didn't really write much of anything. They just kinda smashed tropes together with masking tape and chewing gum.
"My manner of thinking, so you say, cannot be approved. Do you suppose I care? A poor fool indeed is he who adopts a manner of thinking for others!"--Marquis de Sade
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Offline The SlamJam

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Re: Vampires, and Their Many Representations.
« Reply #19 on: March 25, 2017, 04:39:30 AM »
I literally just saw the word 'Monsters' and got a little excited that an old mod was back. :(