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Author Topic: Comedy Genre: Differences in Culture?  (Read 2166 times)

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Offline legomaestro

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Re: Comedy Genre: Differences in Culture?
« Reply #15 on: June 14, 2014, 01:57:03 AM »
Yeah, that sort of hype can be annoying. I know AOT dropped quite a few rungs on my ladder when I saw the popular culture around it. It lost the vibe that attracted me to it.

Offline Lumaria

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Re: Comedy Genre: Differences in Culture?
« Reply #16 on: June 14, 2014, 02:01:34 AM »
I personally enjoy the vibe because its getting people that never liked anime into anime. its definitely a gateway series, but back on topic.

I never fully enjoyed dark humor. Some of it is funny depending on the genre, but i hate series like two and a half men. where these men look pathetic....their child is dumb, and i guess men only satisfaction is having to have those occurrences of "hot" girls. And just when i thought the story was going somewhere, it shoots itself in the foot.

I think humor like that is sometimes done in manga, but not as sad and taken in a far less realistic way.
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Offline GingerStark

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Re: Comedy Genre: Differences in Culture?
« Reply #17 on: June 14, 2014, 06:23:20 AM »
Ohh, I have a weird taste when it comes to humour. South Park is a favourite of mine but family guy I loathe. I found AOT pretty funny at times too, and I do enjoy slice of life. Nichijou is probably my favourite though  :thumbsup:

Offline legomaestro

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Re: Comedy Genre: Differences in Culture?
« Reply #18 on: June 16, 2014, 08:55:58 AM »
When Family Guy insulted the retarded son of an Argentinian politician I just absolutely gave up on it. Family Guy, South Park, all on my sheez-list.

Offline GingerStark

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Re: Comedy Genre: Differences in Culture?
« Reply #19 on: June 16, 2014, 09:02:58 AM »
Oh my  :o Family guy feels lazy to me, like they don't put in any effort for their jokes or storyline.

Offline Coryn

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Re: Comedy Genre: Differences in Culture?
« Reply #20 on: June 16, 2014, 11:38:18 AM »
yeah, family guy hasn't been funny since season 2 or so.

south park still has it's moments. you just have to remember that it's on the far side of the satrical scale. which unfortunately not everybody realizes.

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Offline Lumaria

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Re: Comedy Genre: Differences in Culture?
« Reply #21 on: June 17, 2014, 02:56:28 AM »
yeah, family guy hasn't been funny since season 2 or so.

south park still has it's moments. you just have to remember that it's on the far side of the satrical scale. which unfortunately not everybody realizes.

i dont think knowing how far South park can go is really the bad part.

sometimes i felt family guy tried too hard to be funny with things most of today's youth wouldn't understand 100%.
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Offline NO1SY

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Re: Comedy Genre: Differences in Culture?
« Reply #22 on: June 17, 2014, 06:18:43 AM »
I have to agree about family guy there. Personally I have very little interest and/or knowledge about celebrities and celebrity culture, especially people that were famous from before my time. A lot of Family Guy's humour comes from making reference to these people, which I therefore just don't get. It's not really the fault of the show as much as it is mine, but I feel like one episode they will make the humour really accessible to everyone and then the next episode only people 40 years old+ will get. I tried to watch it back to back at one point but it really didn't hold my interest very long.

My friends and I have always been South Park fans. Despite some over the top crass humour a lot of the time that won't be everyone's cup of tea, a lot of their episode concepts are really good ideas. And a lot of the show's humour comes from it's parody approach to real life situations - which to me is a lot more relatable than Family Guy.

Also the fact that I am Ginger, Jewish and half Canadian just makes watching it a very humorous irony for me. I learned a long time ago that a lot of great humour comes from learning to laugh at yourself, and with my friends and I, we saw so much of ourselves and our interactions emulated in SP that we just found it so much funnier.

Offline GingerStark

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Re: Comedy Genre: Differences in Culture?
« Reply #23 on: June 17, 2014, 09:03:47 AM »
Yeah, South Park literally write their episodes within a week or two before release which means they can comment on events as they happen, which makes them very easy to relate to with a modern audience.

Seth Macfarlane likes to have material more from his generation, which they might appreciate but not people around my age, who would normally watch it for the extreme humour.

Honestly though, I can sit through a South Park episode, but not a family guy because I'd get bored. American Dad is somewhat better, but still feels like an updated version of Family Guy.
King of the Hill though, that's my favourite cartoon comedy  :thumbsup:

Offline NO1SY

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Re: Comedy Genre: Differences in Culture?
« Reply #24 on: June 17, 2014, 10:26:17 AM »
Hehehehe

For the culture side of things I remember a couple of years back I was writing a speech about the worlds funniest joke - now that I think about it, it must have been about 6 or 7 years ago now because it was for my English language GCSE.

My research brought me to a psychological study (which I wish I could find now...) and it listed the humour that different nationalities best responded to. Not sure how they did the study but from what I can remember it said something along the lines of:

- British people like it when misfortune befalls a subject in a joke.

- American people find violence in jokes the funniest.

Aaaaaand unfortunately I don't remember any of the others... Best joke I thought at the time was Sherlock Holmes' and Dr. Watson's camping trip...

On another note I think some people are afraid to find things funny. I remember going to a stand up comedy gig and a local musical comedian - Mitch Benn was performing. He had a song which basically said **** every nationality in Europe and the middle east for various reasons - before then remembering to say that it was about his distaste for the Eurovision Song contest! And whilst I - being all the minorities that I am - found it hilarious, the two older women sitting in front of me stared on straight faced saying "Oh he should not have said **** the Israeli's." Life is more fun when you can just laugh at everything when you know its not meant to offend.

Offline Coryn

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Re: Comedy Genre: Differences in Culture?
« Reply #25 on: June 17, 2014, 10:27:06 AM »
King of the Hill had it's moments, but it always weirded me out some.



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Offline Lumaria

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Re: Comedy Genre: Differences in Culture?
« Reply #26 on: June 17, 2014, 01:14:32 PM »
I personally felt like King of the Hill tried to inform the redneck/western lifestyle as much as stereotyping it.

and then there are times when the story intentionally shoots itself on the foot. like marianne marrying a redneck and getting pregnant, and Bill although having episodes of becoming better, never fully does, or at least makes it so he can.


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Offline GingerStark

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Re: Comedy Genre: Differences in Culture?
« Reply #27 on: June 17, 2014, 04:56:05 PM »
Most comedies like to stick with the status quo, since it makes things easier to work from. Although this does wear thin after a while.

Offline IronQuill

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Re: Comedy Genre: Differences in Culture?
« Reply #28 on: June 17, 2014, 07:34:07 PM »
I looked up an interesting thing about differences in humour across cultures, not just what people laugh at but also the typical conventions of writing a comedy; what type of protagonist to have, jokes that only people from that specific culture can understand, historical context and ect.

So the question I pose to you lovely Raiders is: Can comedy in a manga be understood by Westerners to a big degree and utilised properly?  :-\

generally i only attempt the humor that i can identify readily or those that dont have cultural divisions, although
i do think that a lot of us who read manga have become aware of some nuances of japanese culture, the danger
is if we as writers become patronizing in our attempts. Some manga readers actually believe that manga
is a true
representation of a japanese person not recognizing the escapism or the absurdity of some manga
archetypes
ie the perverted old man is ment to be utterly absurd because it doesnt happen, thats whats funny
about it.