November 17, 2017, 04:16:41 PM

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Messages - Operative13

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 78
1
Develop Your Story / Re: Melody Box (A Novel)
« on: November 12, 2017, 05:53:52 PM »
Original Group: Ravenport Pirates

MC Group: Rogue Ravens

Just my suggestion. Kinda plays off the idea of the two groups having history. As a suggestion, you could try linking the group's name to their place of original, or as an alternative, to a person's name. I don't really know much about your world to give an educated idea, but you'd know what you want  8)

2
The reason the vast majority of anime (at least in today's sense) are adaptions of written works such as manga and light novel is because they have a tried-and-tested audience that are willing to buy such products. Most of the time they serve as glorified advertisements for the story, in which the studio themselves get a cut from the boosted sales of the original author's work itself, finance goods for figurines, pillows, albums etc. and all the other jazz you see.

You'd be very hard-pressed to find even one studio willing to consider, much less even make an anime original without any grounds to back your argument. Even anime directors themselves struggle to find support for anime original work even when they are well-known for their success. That's simply because the risk of a floundering failure is much higher when the idea simply hasn't been tested in the market yet. There's a reason you don't see dark, gritty realism in anime like you did in the 80s and 90s as you do today. There simply isn't a big demand for things like those.  :ninja:

4
break Room / Re: Just Putting it Out There...
« on: October 17, 2017, 04:09:08 PM »
And here I was wondering whatever happened to that mind-tripping story of yours  8) It isn't easy coming up with a scenario that draws readers in like ants in a picnic; much less so readers that stick to it like glue  :D


Personally, I'm not one to remove my submissions on the off-chance I decide to finally flesh things out and finish it. Comes from my gripes about people posting fantastic works of art, then taking it all down one day, never to be seen again from the face of the earth...  :ninja: *stares at Youtube*

But hey, your stories  ;) You get to do whatever pleases you, like killing off the audience's favourite character for lols and giggles.  :biggrin: You have a knack for these kinds of stories, especially those involving personal struggles and enigma.  8)

5
break Room / Re: Do I have social anxiety?
« on: October 15, 2017, 04:53:21 PM »
Actually, this has nothing to do with social anxiety.  :ninja: Glossophobia, or the more common term "Stage Fright" is a completely normal reaction to performing in front of an audience, especially a large one. It's estimated that as many as 3 out of 4 people have this phobia, putting you in the vast majority of everyone else. You would not be alone in feeling that way whenever required to publicly speak.

That having been said, I'd recommend practice. Lots of practice. Try out different styles, such as scripts or improvisation. Personally I favour improv since I only need to remember the most important points and use my "normal talk" to fill in the blanks. If you haven't noticed, your own teachers do it all the time! It would help a lot to start "listening" to them. No, really. Listen to them! Especially the better ones. You'll start to notice how they pace themselves, where they begin their transitions, and how they conclude their lessons. You could learn a thing or two on how other people manage their speeches.  8)

The little details in life give colour to an otherwise large, yet bland world.  ;)

6
MR Pub / Re: Chit Chat 2017
« on: October 02, 2017, 11:52:49 PM »
Oh dear... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KQKUhs5_hGs

Just happened yesterday night at Las Vegas. 59 dead and counting with 500+ casualties, officially becoming the deadliest mass killing in US History.

7
MR Pub / Re: Chit Chat 2017
« on: September 24, 2017, 04:11:04 AM »
1. I find that salary differences are not much of the issue as much as living standards are. Most everyone, if given the opportunity to enjoy an easy and relaxing life, would take it at a moment's notice. A comfortable place to sleep, good food to eat, and some form of leisure to ease their strains. Standards of Living are much more important than salaries, as it would be ridiculous to think simply giving more money would fix everyone's problems: it is simply a temporary solution to a more dire problem. If one wants to gain greater luxury, more work and effort must be put in, however for all others, there must be a starting point for which everyone and anyone could get by. Some spend their whole lives working and never see a coin going to their progress. I find government subsided housing and work to be a more stable option than leaving the poor to fend for themselves. If they want to obtain greater heights, the government gives them a boost just to lift them up to the next platform. However, you'd be hard-pressed to find any politician here willing to even support that idea. Not with private businesses pushing for their own self-interests.

2. It matters a lot. Low inflation typically means more buying power. Back in the day, you could buy a hot dog for just cents on the dollar. Now you're lucky to find one that's not pushing $5. High inflation tends to do that. Keeping the same minimum wage, you find yourself buying less and less, and money that doesn't circulate in the economy means less work to be done, and less work to be done means progress slows. Without any sort of progress, societies wither and die. There must be work, no matter what. The US has been running on fumes for ages, and that's only because they hold their currency hostage. Expanding their influence across the globe means the US could successfully implant their currency into other people's lands, virtually blackmailing them to honour their deals despite the bad currency. That's why the US dollar is still worth something in the global market. And ironically putting us in the same situation as the Roman Empire. It's what happens when you bite off more than you can chew, especially when you don't plan for rainy-day funds like the government should have.

3. Trickle-down economy is in-theory, based entirely on the rationality of the higher-ups. If all the higher-ups had money to spend, they would spend it. That's the idea. But seeing as though humans don't work that way, we've seen the opposite effect. They spend just enough, and all the excess they get is stashed away, never to be put back into the economy, either through tax loopholes, overseas assets, stock markets, etc. They don't spend the money, they store it. And money just piling up is about the same as money getting dumped in the drain: worthless to the economy. Trickle-down only works when there are systems in place to encourage it. Reagan didn't do any of that. He simply assumed people would naturally do that when he lowered taxes and such. :-X Again, people don't act that way. They see it more as a bonus than an opportunity.

4. Tariffs only apply to goods coming outside the US (e.g. Honda, Samsung, Cup Noodles, etc.) Greater tariffs generally benefit the domestic businesses more than the consumers (Has to do with supply and demand), thus why people still buy products from China, Japan, and other countries. Not because they're not patriotic or mindful of the economy, but simply because they have better prices. The majority of people are very simplistic. They don't like to think about the "Greater Order of Things" as much as you would like to believe.  :ninja: Obama attempted to drive forth this point with his taxation on companies investing outside the US, but never got the chance to fully realize it, hence why imported goods still rule over the aisles of today's markets.

8
MR Pub / Re: Chit Chat 2017
« on: September 23, 2017, 11:27:38 PM »
The thing about minimum wages is that there is always a tradeoff between unemployment and inflation. You can't expect to pay your workers higher wages on top of increasing costs. And this ties in with the value of the work itself. If the minimum wage is $15, you're basically saying that a burger-flipper's work is almost just as much as the EMT's $20 wage, a job you have to earn a degree for. When you increase the minimum wage, you indirectly fluctuate the value of everyone else's work up the ladder. Suddenly, everyone else is expected to earn a higher wage as well, and when the businesses themselves aren't growing fast enough to accommodate that, you end up with higher unemployment.

Thus, you may get better pay, but the trade-off is you have to fight harder for your job. The wage alone is enough to employ two people going $8 instead.

9
General Manga writer discussions / Re: Tugging At Your Heartstrings
« on: September 22, 2017, 03:41:27 PM »
In my defense, sh*t happens. :biggrin: The only thing that should be an issue is the fact I gave Daina the one thing she'll ever need: Plot armour.

10
break Room / Re: Would you be open on the idea of a blind date?
« on: September 22, 2017, 03:34:37 PM »
For the spectators, yes. For the participants... not so much. All I can imagine is a bunch of awkward glances and one-liner conversations.  :ninja:

In my opinion, blind dates are only as good as the people involved. If you really aren't the proactive type, you're gonna suffer.  :-X

11
General Manga writer discussions / Re: Tugging At Your Heartstrings
« on: September 20, 2017, 05:32:38 PM »
It ain't murder if it's war  8) Although there are some who would love to scream bloody murder  ;)

12
General Manga writer discussions / Re: Tugging At Your Heartstrings
« on: September 19, 2017, 04:35:07 AM »
There are many ways to convey that feeling of sadness. Denial, rejection, failure, solitude... yet I find that all of these have one core aspect that defines whether someone finds sadness in something: value.

Value comes in many forms. Could be something physical like a house or favorite trinket; or something abstract, like love, beauty, beliefs, so on and so forth. Depending on which parts of the story you wish to emphasize, the audience will find value to what you want them to become attached to, and learn to care for it when the hitter comes to tear it down. It's important that one instills a sense of value with the audience concerning whatever you wish to emphasize, as without it, the audience will find little to no reason to care for that thing when the sad event does happen.

Value is everything. Major characters will have more impact than minor characters. Characters that the audience adores will have more impact than characters the audience detests. Dynamic, well-rounded characters will have more investment with them than static, flat characters. The more investment an audience puts into something, the more value they see in it.

For example, take Daina Allens's squad from my story. Even though the atmosphere is already grim-dark and there have been squad wipeouts in the past, the readers care more about Daina's squad in particular because of the investment put into them, and therefore they are worth more than all the other squads in the story, despite the fact they suffer the same fate as everyone else. I'm not sure if that's a good example to get by, but hopefully that should set a blueprint for whatever you plan to do  8)

13
Manga Writer workshop / Re: Characterisation
« on: September 16, 2017, 06:10:00 PM »
For me personally, Realism tends to be my anchor when creating any set of characters in my stories. I forget about trying to fill "archetypes" and instead just focus on creating a character with a distinct set of traits and personalities that fill the role I want to be done. If anything, personality comes second. In my experience, role comes first in the creation of a character. There's nothing more distracting than a character whose entire existence is just to be there.

Say you want a detective... you start with just a silhouette of a detective. Nothing much to it, just a blank canvas of a detective. They detect things. Yatta yatta yatta... now you have to look in the context of the story. Why do you want a detective? What role are they trying to fulfill? Let's assume that for the sake of this example, this is a typical crime story, and that the main focus here is the detective. Now there are two common ways to go about this story (although there are variations, I won't go over them for this) either this is a rookie-to-superstar type or a grizzled-vet-meets-challenge type story. If the story's about progressing through the ranks, then a younger person would be more suitable than an old one. If it's the other, than vice versa. You start filling in the "holes" as you go about exploring your story and scenario, as I'd like to say. Is this person on their own, or are they still learning the ropes? If they're still learning, then they probably have a mentor to guide them. What about the case itself? Is it a small one or is it one the police has put a lot of strain on? If it's the latter, the department would probably assign skilled detectives to that case. You keep going, jotting down whatever comes to mind about the story's scenario and what this person is intended to do, until there is a solid base underneath this character to work on. Personality is secondary.

I find that personality isn't meant to stand alone in the face of the entire story. It's merely a complement to whatever role that character happens to be fulfilling at that moment. A cheerful girl simply is not as interesting or useful as a flowergirl, and it leaves the character rather stranded in the abyss with no real purpose to grow the story. Looking on the outside, you can more-and-less see yourself as a "hiring manager" of sorts. There are occupations your story needs in order for the plot to run well, and it is your job to fill these roles with the necessary people in order for things to work. Depending on who you choose to fulfill the role, things can progress quite differently. A strict sword-smith would probably outright decline the hero trying to buy his wares than a laid-back one. A reckless friend is more likely to get the protagonist into trouble than a caring one. There are other methods to building characters, but this is one I tend to abide by. Remember, you're not looking to hire "the self-righteous guy" or the "cunning girl" or the "squeamish prick", you're hiring "the lone adventurer", "the rogue assassin", the "bookworm", people who have occupations, not personality. Personality is the cream of the crop, but it should not be mistaken as the basis for good characters. Without a good foundation, characters will crumble to the ground against hefty pressure, particularly in the face of the story's complex plot and setting.  :ninja:

14
break Room / Re: Have you ever been asked out by a teacher?
« on: September 05, 2017, 06:02:05 PM »
Right off the bat, I can say this guy is not a good person. First he asks for time after school for "guidance" - already something misleading - then he begins to go about how he's always looking your way and having "thoughts"... I don't care how many times romance movies show that type of behavior, that act is creepy. If this was a different situation, I would have said otherwise, but this one is not acceptable.

There's a reason it is forbidden to have student-teacher relationships and that's because of bias. The moment there is some sort of relationship, it disrupts the academic environment and damages people's ability to learn. Not just yourself, but other people as well. It was stupid of him to even consider asking that question and much more so to use his authority to mislead you about your meeting.

Like I said, had it been any other situation, I would have said otherwise, but if I were the one-in-charge, I'd have the man investigated. Doesn't matter if it's one person out of a thousand teachers asking once, there is a standard that every teacher uphold their pledge on maintaining an academic environment among their pupils. If this idiot can't even keep his mouth shut for that, I have to question his motive for teaching.  :ninja:

15
Members Workshops / Re: MangaRaiders Artist Marathon Workshop Signup
« on: September 04, 2017, 03:18:00 AM »
Did someone say War...?


This'll be fun  8)

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