October 13, 2019, 11:13:41 PM

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Author Topic: Hello all! New here!  (Read 226 times)

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Offline RobinVie

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Re: Hello all! New here!
« Reply #15 on: October 12, 2019, 01:27:23 PM »
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The trick to committing is understanding that motivation doesn't just come out of nowhere.
I have a power up routine that I have to get maximum power but I often overshoot and become hyperactive so it's not all that great haha :P

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I changed it to going to a coffee shop, takes some money but it's worth it
This is true, I pop to coffee shops with my family for a bit of down time for lunch when I can. I don't draw though :P

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Knowing yourself is important in that regard
Hard agree on this one, what works for one person may not work for others, you have to figure out your own strengths and weaknesses.

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information piles up when I look at them I can see the amount of work I already done, which also gives me motivation.
I can also vouch for this, although at some point motivation switches to disbelief :P


Sounds like you've figured yourself out pretty well, which is awesome.

I wonder though, when drawing in public do you get much attention from people? I don't really like drawing in public because I don't like attracting attention to myself very much, but I wonder if it's a bit of a false fear. I know Legomaestro has had people approach him when drawing in public so I'm wondering if it's a universal thing for artists.

Depends, when I'm just sketching out on my a5 sketchbook, sometimes people look but don't say anything, so I would say I don't get much attention. On the rare occasion I'm caught drawing someone and they ask me to show it and get pretty amused, but that's it.

I also do plein air paintings when I have the time, I tend to chose places without people as well but I've painted in the city and in places like beaches where there's a lot of people. Because of the big setup it draws a lot of attention and I'll be completely surrounded by people without even noticing.

Either way it never bothered me tbh, I just space out and hardly ever notice them. I remember when I was younger since I have a lot of anxiety I would start to shake and get nervous. But the thing about getting nervous and anxious is that once you get experience in the same situation it stops happening and you gain confidence. And you don't even have to do that around other people, if you draw enough, you gain confidence in drawing, when you are presented with drawing in front of others it won't affect it. I'd even say I draw better in front of others tbh.

My issue with drawing in public comes from drawing with friends that also draw or paint. Most of my friends from school aren't in the industry and switched out jobs while drawing/painting as an hobby, so they're fundamentals aren't as solid and I can see that they somehow feel inferior and depressed when they see me drawing in front of them. They won't come out directly but they joke indirectly about it with comments like "like seriously how do you draw so fast? wtf. You draw something that would take me a day in less than a minute", followed by them closing down their sketchbooks and stop drawing in front of me. I keep trying to help them get better, but they need to get loose and they can't, drawing alongside someone that they consider better only makes it worse, it seems.

This is the only situation that I haven't learned how to deal with because my experience is different. When I went to my first THU, I felt nervous drawing and doing small colab sketches with artists like kim jung gi which are considered the top on our industry and highly praised, but never to the point where I closed my sketchbook and gave up, it had the opposite effect, I'd draw more and more and implemented stuff that I saw others doing while trying to learn from them.

The first time it happened in thu, I was drawing with another guy that went with me on a coffee shop during the first day, and this group approached, asked to sit down and looked at us drawing for about an hour while complimenting and asking about us (they knew we were in the same event because we all wear these thu tags around our necks), it was pretty funny because after an hour I asked "what about you guys, where have you worked?" and they answered "Oh, we're the cdprojekt team, before we both worked at bungie". I was pretty amazed because they didn't even bother to tell us that they worked at a major company during the first hour. Considering my background at the time (which was basically only school) I was used to artists shouting out their achievements, so that moment had a big impact on how I saw "more successful artists than myself", they didn't see us as amateurs, they saw us as one of them.

I remember we did this drawing game where you'd draw something, pass to the next person, that person would make a "title" for that illustration and hide it, pass to the next person, the next person would draw an illustration based on the title/description, hide that description and pass it to the next, and so on until it went full circle. At the end it was incredibly different from the original illustration, it was pretty fun. I was very embarrassed and nervous but because of the environment I got comfortable.
Honestly if I you were to ask me "what type of practice do you think was most important in your learning process" I'd answer with this type of situation, it was drawing with people better than me in person. It's completely different from watching kim jung gi on a youtube video, you can actually see through his thought process, and the parts you can't you just ask directly.

Because of this it's hard for me to empathize with my friend's situation and adapt to it, it's a type of situation that happened through my whole life, even when I was an amateur, and I never learned how to deal with it.
I still can't put my art buddies at ease and make them feel like I see them just like I see myself because they have this exaggerated idea of my success, so in those situations it's a bit awkward. Around random people it's indifferent.

Another thing to keep in mind is that I actually got a bunch of job offers from drawing in public. Usually it's not completely random people, but stuff like the owner of the coffee shop passing by and asking "hey look, I have this banner I want to put out front and I was wondering if you could paint the staff with our logo and something related to food on it". So i'd say it's one of the best things to do for offline networking.
« Last Edit: October 12, 2019, 02:05:27 PM by RobinVie »

Offline suuper-san

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Re: Hello all! New here!
« Reply #16 on: Today at 08:21:33 AM »
Wow that's a lot of thoughts

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But the thing about getting nervous and anxious is that once you get experience in the same situation it stops happening and you gain confidence.
Yeah I get quite nervous when other people watch me draw, or do work of any kind to be honest :P

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"more successful artists than myself", they didn't see us as amateurs, they saw us as one of them.
That's real nice.

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I still can't put my art buddies at ease and make them feel like I see them just like I see myself because they have this exaggerated idea of my success, so in those situations it's a bit awkward. Around random people it's indifferent.
Yeah drawing around people that are not artistic at all or not as skilled as you does result in a lot of "wow you're really great" and "I could never draw that good", which does feel strange when it's people you know. In that regard I would prefer it be strangers saying it :P

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So i'd say it's one of the best things to do for offline networking.
Yeah you're not the first that I've heard that from. I think it's very different from the way I want to network and the type of work that I want but it's not a bad thing for sure.

Hmmmm well you've given me a bit to think on, hopefully I can get over my nervousness and draw more in public.
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Offline RobinVie

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Re: Hello all! New here!
« Reply #17 on: Today at 07:48:07 PM »
Wow that's a lot of thoughts

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But the thing about getting nervous and anxious is that once you get experience in the same situation it stops happening and you gain confidence.
Yeah I get quite nervous when other people watch me draw, or do work of any kind to be honest :P

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"more successful artists than myself", they didn't see us as amateurs, they saw us as one of them.
That's real nice.

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I still can't put my art buddies at ease and make them feel like I see them just like I see myself because they have this exaggerated idea of my success, so in those situations it's a bit awkward. Around random people it's indifferent.
Yeah drawing around people that are not artistic at all or not as skilled as you does result in a lot of "wow you're really great" and "I could never draw that good", which does feel strange when it's people you know. In that regard I would prefer it be strangers saying it :P

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So i'd say it's one of the best things to do for offline networking.
Yeah you're not the first that I've heard that from. I think it's very different from the way I want to network and the type of work that I want but it's not a bad thing for sure.

Hmmmm well you've given me a bit to think on, hopefully I can get over my nervousness and draw more in public.

It's a lot of thoughts yea! You're bringing up interesting topics tbh. Speaking of which there's 2 types of networking imo, offline and online.

Online is way more competitive and people tend to do it for the passive income (from pantreon, gumroads, etsy, society6/redbubble, amazon merch or wtv it's called, youtube, twitch, skillshare etc. ) , this way they build a huge network and are basically hired because of their social status, instead of their actual work. I wish I could do this, but I can't keep social networks and handle a lot of people at the same time, it just doesn't work for introverts tbh (I don't mean shy people, shyness can be overcome, I mean actual introverts since you basically have to sell your image and persona online).

Offline is less competitive, and there's 2 subtypes, local or worldwide. Locally is what I previously mentioned with the coffee shop example, just get in touch with companies and businesses in your area, make a small studio maybe, and live from that niche. This is what most people end up doing from experience. The upside is that it's really stable and you don't need to be moving around. This makes it possible to have a social life and relationships. The downside is that you have to talk to people a lot and sell your "product" in person to people that aren't even looking for it initially but past that it's pretty okay. You also have to do a lot of different things that you might not like, like logos for example, which is the reason why I don't like this method personally. Doesn't matter where you live, there's always work involving art, even 3d, I didn't realize this until way later on. The reason you can't do this online is that local businesses tend not to have websites for some reason, so you'll be missing out on a lot of them.

The worldwide subtype is more difficult, and it requires a big investment. You have to go to events like the ones I mentioned, thu and ifcc and make connections within the industry. This way you basically get jobs everywhere, they can be remote or in studio. The benefit is that you don't need popularity like the online type, you don't even have to have your work posted, most of us don't, and because you know people in person they will give you absolute priority over others, you're actually applying for companies on the spot, so they can see you working in person before even hiring you, this gives them reassurance over hiring someone online. The downside is that it's really bad for people that have a lot of personal relationships as you'll be moving around a lot probably. It's perfect for introverts, the only contact with people you have is basically in those events so it doesn't "tire you out".

I'm one of those types of people, I basically have no personal connections outside of work colleagues because handling a lot of people tires me out, which sounds kind of sad but it isn't. It's just a different way of living. I feel it's a bit ironic because a decade or so ago, it was actually the opposite, online was the best for people like me, but nowadays that changed because the internet is now the most popular thing in the world. So while I initially worked online I changed it to working through offline means as it's easier for someone like myself.

I think all of this goes back to what I said in the other comment about knowing yourself as a person. The way you go about approaching networking doesn't matter for success because you can have success in either type, but it matters a lot in terms of being healthy. I have some colleagues that don't understand this and are unhappy because of it. I'll give an example of one of them, this guy is so engaged online that it's messing up his life, he's depressed and says that art was a mistake all the time, it's a lot of pressure to post stuff everyday and answer comments (he even hires people to answer his comments and manage his accounts). He could have worked in another way and it would be more healthy in his case. But because it's not really obvious that you can work through offline means (I still see a lot of people commenting on reddit that you have to be popular online to get jobs and it's really unfair) he chose a method that didn't suit him. I know people that are 100% happy working online, they live to be popular, he's just not one of those people, nor am I.

Realizing what matter of approaching it suits you as a person is incredibly important and it's not always obvious. Fortunately it's not set in stone you can find by trial and error.

Regarding the getting nervous part, it's just a matter of getting used to it. You probably feel that way because you feel you're not good enough yet. When artists feel that way it tends to lead to lack of confidence, art blocks, spending a lot of time on a single piece, having strokes in their work that aren't clean, etc. I believe that once you get all the basic fundamentals to a certain degree that automatically disappears, which means that your fundamentals probably aren't solid enough.

There's no science to it, so I'm saying all of this from personal experience and watching others, but that seems to be the case most of the time. Let's say you're not used to rotating objects in perspective or slopes, I for example, suck at it and make a whole mess which is why I use 3d to block in environments, otherwise I can't keep track of all the extra vanishing points for each rotation, when I have to draw traditionally I just wing it by intuition tbh. But if there's someone looking at me doing that, I'll feel nervous 100%.

That's just because I'm not confident enough in it, and there's actually a reason for it! In school no one ever told me that I could use more vanishing points or even create them outside the horizon line (besides specifically the 3 point one), so I learned that way too late and only complicated my learning process, I literally thought for years that perspective was just the 1,2,3 point ones, and that's all I needed to know, I remember that I asked multiple times to multiple teachers "what if the planes aren't parallel and I need to rotate an object" but never got an answer to that question until years later after working in multiple companies , also why I agree that art schools are a waste of time but that's an entire different subject  ;)